Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Sing along if you know it



… with boughs of holly, fa la la la laa, la laa laa laaaaa. Or if you live where I do, deck the verandah with bits of driftwood.

It's been a huge year, with not much time for drawing lines either on paper or in the water. But I've thoroughly enjoyed the times I've been able to get stuck into either; between work, children and life in general.

Whatever you're doing on Christmas day, I hope it makes you stoked.


Thursday, September 26, 2013

Beyond the Veil


I was delighted to be asked to contribute to the third issue of Sea Stoke, an online magazine exploring broader surf culture. It’s the second time I’ve been involved, and as per last time I feel very humbled  (and maybe a little inadequate!) to be included among so much talent. The article I illustrated is about women’s surfing in Iran—absolutely fascinating subject matter, and very inspirational. It’s articles like this that make me so proud to be involved with Sea Stoke. Stoked!

Monday, July 29, 2013

Art show


My husband teaches at a local primary school, and like all teachers is often called upon to help out with extra-curricular events. Sometimes this means I end up helping too. This year the school is putting on a fundraising art show featuring a number of local and established artists, as well as (of course) the students. I drew this little logo for the show—a small contribution to a worthwhile event. If you're local, make sure you get to the opening night where you might just take home a masterpiece!

Friday, June 21, 2013

Four is the new three


One week down... and all is well. Hopefully a taste of things to come!

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Sea Stoke



I recently realised I haven’t posted anything here since July last year. I’m not sure if anyone has even noticed, but regardless I thought it was high time to do something about it. Since my last post things have been extremely busy with work, family and as much surfing as I can fit in before our next baby arrives in 5 weeks (admittedly it’s getting pretty tricky by this point!).

There has been the occasional sketch though—this one was for online magazine Sea Stoke. The article I was asked to illustrate examines the plight of seahorses in Cambodia. I love surf publications that look a little deeper into what it means to be a surfer (or simply someone who loves the ocean). So I was honoured to be involved in this issue. Issue #3 is coming up soon, an illustration for which I’m currently working on—stay tuned to see the results... hopefully in less than a year :)

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Cycling goes surf


Pactimo creates limited edition custom cycling apparel from their Colorado base. They approached me with the idea of producing some Australian/Surf-inspired kits to add to their already impressive designer gallery. Naturally I was stoked!

The first design to roll off the line is inspired by some of my favourite Australian surf breaks. Check out the gear here. To celebrate its release, Pactimo are offering the Surf apparel at 20% off for a limited time — what better excuse to treat yourself to some cycling goodness before they run out?


Sunday, July 22, 2012

Drawn Lines on Liquid Salt


I'm honoured to be featured on Liquid Salt this week, amongst some pretty illustrious company. Not sure how I managed to sneak in but I'm stoked! Big alohas and mahalo to the editor Glenn for tracking me down.

You can read my interview here.

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

It's ok to get skunked




Originally inspired by a section in Thomas Campbell's Sprout, we recently visited Sri Lanka — specifically Arugam Bay. Naturally expectations were high. But like all real-life surf trips (as opposed to the ones you see edited in movies) the forces of nature don't always come together in the way one would hope. In our case, this meant that some of the breaks we (well, mostly I) wanted to surf weren't working at all, and the others, while fun, weren't performing to their full potential. After traveling for thousands of kilometres to surf it's a bit disheartening to know that for whatever reason, you'd lucked out.

Despite this, we had a great time. What surprised me most was firstly the number of stoked surfers we met in the water who came from landlocked countries, who either only surfed once a year or who were complete novices, absolutely charging. The second surprise was how amazing the local people were: genuinely friendly, funny, hospitable and with freakish memories — after a few days you couldn't help but feel you were friends with everyone in town.

Even though we did manage to get some fun waves, at the end of the day I still think that on the surf front, we missed out. But as this trip proved to me, sometimes it's ok to get skunked.

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Fin-tastic



It's been a while since I posted anything here... The day job has been really hectic of late, involving scooting back and forth across the ditch (for the uninitiated that means going to New Zealand — land of the long white cloud and the world's best ice cream). So I haven't had much time to do any drawing, let alone post about not doing any drawing.

However, good mate Azza has been busy shaping me an Old Salty model pig. I decided to go with a pretty traditional colourway, but wanted to spice up the fin. I have a couple of metres of Mambo fabric with a Reg Mombassa print that I procured from an outlet sale about 10 years ago, and have been wondering what to do with it ever since. I reckon it's been put to pretty good use here! Now I just have to decide what to do with the rest of it...

Monday, March 12, 2012

Stoked on shelving



You might be wondering how a post about shelving made its way here. How are shelves surf-related? If I may draw a slightly long bow...

Ever since a very small person came to live with us, it's become increasingly imperative that we get some adjustable storage. And what better than custom-made shelves constructed from 60-year old reclaimed timber and industrial steel? The whole process was such a labour of love that it seemed only fitting to document the final construction.

And the relevance to surfing? The wood originates a stone's throw from MR's home break. The builder Kyal is a shredder in his own right. And the shelves are now home to, among other things, our precious collection of The Surfer's Journal — safely out of reach of tiny hands (and mouths).

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Jolly Roger



Finally, The Jolly Roger. This model is still in prototype phase, so if you want to find out what the finished boards are like, check back at the Sealegged blog.

Monday, January 9, 2012

Fat Kid


As well as old-school aficionados, Sealegged caters for shortboard enthusiasts with the Fat Kid — but don't let the name fool you, this thing is more like 'phat with a ph' than Norm from Life Be In It (remember him?).

Sunday, January 8, 2012

Ten Pin



If you're looking for an all-conditions longboard the Ten Pin is a good start — lighter than a log but tough enough to withstand a few knocks. And hopefully a board you can get your piggies over (mmmmm, there's that bacon again).

Saturday, January 7, 2012

Old Salty



Old Salty is the name given to Sealegged's pig model. I love a good pun, and I also love bacon. This may be the perfect board for me.

Friday, January 6, 2012

Captain's Log



Azza has been shaping various longboards for a while now, but there are some shapes that are requested more frequently. The Captain's Log is, as the name suggests, a heavy single-fin longboard, perfect for navigating with style through little peelers.

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Boiled Lolly


The Boiled Lolly is a 2+1 stubby that got its name from the delicious colourway of the very first one Azza shaped. It's almost good enough to eat, but probably better to ride.

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

Sealegged: Quadzilla



A while ago I designed some 'shaped by' decals for Azza Frost of Sealegged. With production steadily increasing, there are now some models based on the most popular designs, and I've created logos for each. Over the next few days I'll post them all, but here's the first: Quadzilla. A four-finned shred sled that tears through the surf like a giant reptile on the rampage.

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

Manufacturing Stoke — review




I don't normally write film reviews — there's probably a good reason why I became a designer instead of a writer — but I wanted to have a go, in support of Manufacturing Stoke. The director Pierce Kavanagh is surfing's answer to Michael Moore — the movie can be hard to watch at times, but it's something I think every surfer should see. Anyway. Here I go...

Manufacturing Stoke (directed by Pierce Michael Kavanagh, misfit pictures)
Rob Machado, Dan Malloy, Kassia Meador and Alex Knost do not appear in this film. The first surfer featured is 9-year old Tiara Thompson: an environmentally-aware, frothing girl-grom from California. And that is perhaps the most refreshing aspect of Manufacturing Stoke — it is one of very few independent films not relying on 'in-crowd' surfers to garner appeal. In fact, the lack of prominent surfers and locations makes this almost an anti-surf film. If sponsored shredders are the tip of the surfing iceberg, Manufacturing Stoke goes below the surface to bring up a colourful and varied cast of pioneers and commentators including the eccentric and inspirational Carl Ekstrom, Richard Kenvin, Jon Wegener and others.

For the first part of the movie, you could be forgiven for thinking you were watching an episode of Grumpy Old Men — grey-haired blokes with a malibu-chip on their shoulder about an industry that is partly responsible for propelling the planet towards environmental doom. And you could also be forgiven for thinking that the man behind it all is Grubby Clark. But as the film rolls on it becomes apparent that there is a future for surfing — and it's getting progressively greener. The old guard are graciously handing the baton to a new breed of environmentally conscious independent surfers, shapers and manufacturers like Danny Hess, Lucas Dirkse, Ed Lewis, and Clay Peterson of Marko Foam. As the focus shifts to this new generation, the outlook seems increasingly positive. Here are a growing group of modern-day pioneers whose innovations are starting the next big and much-needed change to the surf industry paradigm — what some commentators are labeling surfing's true renaissance. It's an exciting time to be a surfer, and Manufacturing Stoke gives us a peek into future possibilities.

Manufacturing Stoke's production values follow the lead of pictures by directors like Jason Baffa and Thomas Campbell — with plenty of atmosphere, sensitive camera work, a palpable story-line and a bespoke soundtrack. But it's the film's core message that makes it so different, and so challenging. This is not the sort of movie you put on to fill the background. It demands concentration and a willingness to look at your own surfing habits in the cold green light of environmental responsibility.

Much like the nature of the youthful surfers featured, Manufacturing Stoke asks hard questions and urges you to answer them. While it provides an insight into how the industry is changing for the better, at the end of the day it is up to individuals to make responsible choices and change their own habits at a personal level. There's no neat-and-tidy happy ending here, but the education that this film provides brings us one step closer.

Monday, November 28, 2011

Manufacturing Stoke

I made this little drawing in honour of Manufacturing Stoke, a new documentary by Pierce Kavanagh of Misfit Pictures, exploring sustainability in surfing. As someone who finds joy in the ocean, this is an issue close to home. For more info check the official website, or visit thesurfnetwork.com to download the film.

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

One Fin #2



Featuring some close-ups of the quiver